Creating the Extraordinary Student Experience

Sanctions

We use the sanctioning process to meet several goals, most of which are educational and developmental – meaning we use sanctions to help our students stay on an upward arc by acquiring new skills and developing a fuller sense of their moral and ethical selves. When possible, we choose sanctions that provide opportunities for our students to repair the harm done by their behavior. We also use sanctions to communicate university values and community expectations for behavior.

Disciplinary Sanctions

We will give a student found in violation of the Code of Student Conduct, one of the following disciplinary sanctions:  

formal reprimand is written notice to students that their behavior was unacceptable. We evaluate every case individually, but generally, we give a formal reprimand only for minor first-time violations. A formal reprimand is NOT noted on the student’s academic transcript. But it does become part of the student’s disciplinary record.

Probation is a state of warning. Further violation of university rules, policies, standards, or guidelines during the probationary period will additionally be viewed as a violation of the probation, which shall result in further action up to and including suspension or dismissal. Probation can last from one semester to multiple semesters or indefinitely. By itself, probation usually does not affect a student’s ability to register for classes or other aspects of enrollment, such as living in a residence hall or obtaining athletic tickets. While on probation, a student’s options to study abroad may be limited. We encourage students to disclose plans to study abroad to their hearing officer.

Suspension is separation from the university for one or more semesters. Once suspended, a student is withdrawn from classes. The student will NOT receive credit for those classes. Once suspended, a student is barred from campus and may NOT attend sponsored university events or activities. A student who completes all required sanctions will be welcomed back to the university at the end of the suspension period. Though, sometimes the student’s return comes with stipulations (not permitted to live on campus, participate in certain activities, subject to random drug screens, restricted from certain campus areas or buildings).

Dismissal is permanent separation from the university. When we dismiss a student, the student is withdrawn from classes. Once dismissed, the student is permanently barred from campus. Unlike academic dismissal, a student cannot later petition to re-enroll.

Educational Sanctions

Educational sanctions prompt students to reflect on their conduct, become better informed and develop new skills so that they can make better choices going forward. On a case-by-case basis, we consider appropriate educational sanctions to address the specific behavior involved. Below are examples of educational sanctions we frequently use.

  • ACADEMIC INTEGRITY SEMINAR: an online ethical development seminar through the "Academic Integrity Seminar.” The student will have an individual instructor who will communicate with him/her by e-mail. Student will complete a series of readings and respond to ethical questions posed by those readings. The student is responsible for all associated costs ($100.00 fee).
  • ASSESSMENT (DRUG AND/OR ALCOHOL): an assessment is an opportunity for the student to work with a counselor who is an expert in substance abuse one-on-one to assess their behaviors and risks associated with alcohol and/or drug abuse. The result will be a recommendation concerning the level of risk and possible follow-up, including further education, group meetings, outpatient treatment, inpatient treatment, etc. The student is responsible for all associated costs ($300.00 fee; $100.00/session, 3 sessions total).
  • BASICS: stands for Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students. This program allows students to examine their alcohol use, and to assist students in reducing risky behaviors and harmful consequences of alcohol abuse. The program is designed to assist students in examining their own behavior in a judgment-free environment. The BASICS facilitator will provide objective feedback, based on an interview and questionnaires filled out by the student, in order to encourage positive changes in drinking behavior. Essentially, BASICS will provide the information and guidance, but what a student chooses to do with it is entirely up to him/her. Student is responsible for all associated costs ($75.00 fee).
  • CASICS: stands for Cannabis Screening and Intervention for College Students. This program allows students to examine their marijuana use, and to assist students in reducing risky behaviors and harmful consequences of marijuana abuse. The program is designed to assist students in examining their own behavior in a judgment-free environment. The CASICS facilitator will provide objective feedback, based on an interview and questionnaires filled out by the student, in order to encourage positive changes in behavior. Essentially, CASICS will provide the information and guidance, but what a student chooses to do with it is entirely up to him/her. Student is responsible for all associated costs ($75.00 fee).
  • EDUCATIONAL/REFLECTIVE ASSIGNMENT: a written assignment or activity that allows the student to reflect on the behavior/incident in question, identify the knowledge, skills, and abilities acquired through participation in the conduct process, and demonstrate how participation in this process will inform future action.
  • WELLNESS COACHING: This is a free service that provides students the opportunity to grow their capacity to create the lives they want to live, now and in the future. Students will consult with a wellness coach to talk about the conduct that resulted in the violation along with new opportunities and challenges that may arise in the future, specifically addressing decision making skills, support resources, and future goal setting.

Factors We Consider When Sanctioning

Sanctions are commensurate with the violation, though subsequent violations often result in more serious disciplinary sanctions. In addition to previous violations, here is a list of some other factors we consider in determining appropriate sanctions:

  • The nature of the violation
  • A student's level of involvement in the violation
  • Actual  harm caused by the behavior or the potential risk of harm
  • The student's intent
  • The impact on the community
  • The severity and pervasiveness of the behavior
  • The student's demonstrated understanding and sincere remorse
  • The student's level of cooperation and compliance 
  • The level of success of prior interventions

This is a partial list. We evaluate each student's situation individually when considering other mitigating and aggravating factors. Our students should note that under Code of Student Conduct Section 3335-23-17, impairment resulting from voluntary use of alcohol or drugs (i.e., other than medically necessary) will be considered an aggravating, and not a mitigating, factor.